textsfromgayswimmers:

He may be bigger, but he’s still Nagisa’s prey.

submitted by 

ps: your url is fucking amazing

harmoni0880:

i’ve blogged this like 5 times and i still love it

thewinchesterswagger:

jaredsgirl86:

blood-junky:

#I feel like I’m watching a rare, homosexual faery mating ritual from the bushes

image

*National Geographic voice* In this rare, never before seen footage, we see the homosexuals gather to attract a mate by flatulent dance, commencing the supernatural fairy ritual.

joker-ace:

a random comic about that weird moment in dreams where u think u know a guy but then??? u dont??

SIGNS FROM MOST TO LEAST HETEROSEXUAL

fuckindisneyprincess:

aaastrology:

Gemini
Libra
Sagittarius
Leo
Cancer
Pisces
Scorpio
Aquarius
Capricorn
Virgo
Aries
Taurus

I am apparently medium gay

I am apparently also medium gay


NO HUMAN
DO NOT BOOP MY NOSE
RAWWWWWRRRRRRRR

NO HUMAN

DO NOT BOOP MY NOSE

RAWWWWWRRRRRRRR

saehaven:

g0ds-own-prototype:

funnywildlife:

Strange tree with a fresh water spring #Kashmir

guys, i think i found the fountain of youth

This is tuck everlasting

saehaven:

g0ds-own-prototype:

funnywildlife:

Strange tree with a fresh water spring #Kashmir

guys, i think i found the fountain of youth

This is tuck everlasting

librarienne:

direcartographies:

fun fact: the reason that the plural of goose is geese but the plural of moose is not meese is because goose derives from an ancient germanic word undergoing strong declension, in the pattern of foot/feet and tooth/teeth, wherein oo is mutated to ee. however ‘moose’ is a native american word added to the english lexicon only ~400 years ago, and lacks the etymological reason to be pluralized in that way.

Oh baby.  Keep talking dirty to me.

femalegaze:

schmurple:

think-progress:

Arizona Professor Offers Extra Credit To Female Students Who Stop Shaving Their Armpits

Professor Breanne Fahs offers female students extra-credit if they “stop shaving their legs and underarms for ten weeks during the semester while keeping a journal to document their experiences.” For Fahs, who teaches women and gender studies, the purpose is to get students thinking critically about societal norms and gender roles.A similar opportunity is available to men in Fahs’ classes who recieve extra credit for shaving all of their hair from the neck down.One student, Stephanie Robinson, described it as a “life-changing experience:"Many of my friends didn’t want to work out next to me or hear about the assignment, and my mother was distraught at the idea that I would be getting married in a white dress with armpit hair. I also noticed the looks on faces of strangers and people around campus who seemed utterly disgusted by my body hair. It definitely made me realize that if you’re not strictly adhering to socially prescribed gender roles, your body becomes a site for contestation and public opinion."

They published a paper about this the first time someone did it, and it showed that non-white young women experienced a lot more pressure from friends and relatives to remove their hair. The authors suggested that because beauty standards are white - long, fine, flowy blonde hair, blue eyes, etc, etc - his body hair non-conformity was more troubling in WOC, as they crossed yet another boundary of femininity. They were also more likely to have darker or thicker body hair, so it would stand out more than on the blonde women, for example. For me that sort of exemplifies why it’s so important to have multiple, intersectional feminisms. Because “let’s not shave our legs!” might be a powerful and important message, but it’s ultimately one of white privilege that sort of ignores the whiteness of these beauty standards in the first place.

femalegaze:

schmurple:

think-progress:

Arizona Professor Offers Extra Credit To Female Students Who Stop Shaving Their Armpits

Professor Breanne Fahs offers female students extra-credit if they “stop shaving their legs and underarms for ten weeks during the semester while keeping a journal to document their experiences.” For Fahs, who teaches women and gender studies, the purpose is to get students thinking critically about societal norms and gender roles.
A similar opportunity is available to men in Fahs’ classes who recieve extra credit for shaving all of their hair from the neck down.
One student, Stephanie Robinson, described it as a “life-changing experience:
"Many of my friends didn’t want to work out next to me or hear about the assignment, and my mother was distraught at the idea that I would be getting married in a white dress with armpit hair. I also noticed the looks on faces of strangers and people around campus who seemed utterly disgusted by my body hair. It definitely made me realize that if you’re not strictly adhering to socially prescribed gender roles, your body becomes a site for contestation and public opinion."

They published a paper about this the first time someone did it, and it showed that non-white young women experienced a lot more pressure from friends and relatives to remove their hair. The authors suggested that because beauty standards are white - long, fine, flowy blonde hair, blue eyes, etc, etc - his body hair non-conformity was more troubling in WOC, as they crossed yet another boundary of femininity. They were also more likely to have darker or thicker body hair, so it would stand out more than on the blonde women, for example. 

For me that sort of exemplifies why it’s so important to have multiple, intersectional feminisms. Because “let’s not shave our legs!” might be a powerful and important message, but it’s ultimately one of white privilege that sort of ignores the whiteness of these beauty standards in the first place.

THEME